Do we actually know what Hijrah is all about? It is not merely just the calendar, Hijrah is something we need to learn about. The Hijrah is the migration or journey of Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him) from Mecca to Medinah in the year 622. The date shows the starting point of the Muslim era. The Hijrah is also identified as the start of the Islamic calendar, the one we use until this very day.

The first month of the Hijrah year is Muharram, which is considered as one of the four sacred months (Zulhijjah, Zulkaedah and Rejab, being the other three). In Surah At-Tawbah:

“Indeed, the number of months with Allah is twelve [lunar] months in the register of Allah [from] the day He created the heavens and the earth; of these, four are sacred. That is the correct religion, so do not wrong yourselves during them…” (Surah at-Tawbah, 9:36)

Ibn’ Abbas said regarding the above verse from the Quran, these four months were singled out and made sacred. Sins committed in these four months are more severe, while good deeds bring greater rewards. One of the best things to do in the month of Muharram is to fast.

The Prophet (PBUH) said: “The best of fasting after Ramadan is fasting Allah’ month of Muharram.” [Muslim]

As Hijrah refers to migration, Muslims all around the world see it as a revolution, a transformation, a new hope, a turning point. Hijrah, in its essence, is the process of a migration to a better situation. It is the search for an environment to a more favourable and effort. One significant aspect and lesson we learned from our Prophet Muhammad’s (PBUH) Hijrah is that, immediately after reaching Medinah, our Prophet undertook a complicated process to a faithful and strong society.

When the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) made the Hijrah from Mecca to Medinah, he did not just transfer his residence or take shelter in another city, but as soon as he arrived in Medinah, he began the transformation of that city in every aspect. It is important for us to study and reflect on the things that he did in Medinah. There are many lessons for us in that history and we can learn many things for our life.

When the Prophet (Peace Be Upon Him) made the Hijrah from Mecca to Medinah, he did not just transfer his residence or took shelter in another city, but as soon as he arrived in Medinah, he began the transformation of that city in every aspect.

Hijrah was one of the most important events in the history of Islam. Because of this, Umar (may Allah be pleased with him) adopted the Hijrah date to calculate years. Muslims chose Hijrah as the focal point to work out their chronology. In physical terms, Hijrah was a journey between two cities about 300 miles apart, but in its grand significance, it marked the beginning of an era: a civilization, a culture and a history for the whole mankind. Islam improved not only from the physical Hijrah, but because Muslims took Hijrah seriously in all its aspects and dimensions.

In physical terms, Hijrah was a journey between two cities about 300 miles apart, but in its grand significance, it was the beginning of an era: a civilisation, a culture and a history for the entire mankind.

We might think that the migration was a simple three-day journey between two cities, but do we give much thought about the implications faced? Living among the globalised world we are in today, we tend to forget the difficulty of taking a journey to a completely new region. Being in the Generation Y or more popularly known as ‘millennials’ from the 20th-21st century, we are so used to using cars and the public transportation to get to places. It may be hard for some of us to picture how difficult it was to take a journey way back in the day.

Simply put, what Hijrah teaches us is that, wherever Muslims go, they should bring integrity and goodness to their destination. Muslims should work for both moral and material goodness of the society.

As human beings living in the 21st century, there are so many ways to ‘hijrah‘ ourselves, physical and moral. Physical migration can be defined as a process of moving, either across an international border, or within the state. Moral migration refers to abandoning something and to neglect it. This could be having a different outlook on life, to change how we dress, to improve ourselves whether it is our characteristics, beliefs and or our values.